1. I am sitting in a room different from the one you are in now. I am recording the sound of my speaking voice and I am going to play it back into the room again and again until the resonant frequencies of the room reinforce themselves so that any semblance of my speech, with perhaps the exception of rhythm, is destroyed. What you will hear, then, are the natural resonant frequencies of the room articulated by speech. I regard this activity not so much as a demonstration of a physical fact, but more as a way to smooth out any irregularities my speech might have.
  2. I am sitting in a room different from the one you are in now. I am recording the sound of my speaking voice and I am going to play it back into the room again and again until the resonant frequencies of the room reinforce themselves so that any semblance of my speech, with perhaps the exception of rhythm, is destroyed. What you will hear, then, are the natural resonant frequencies of the room articulated by speech. I regard this activity not so much as a demonstration of a physical fact, but more as a way to smooth out any irregularities my speech might have.
  3. I am sitting in a room different from the one you are in now. I am recording the sound of my speaking voice and I am going to play it back into the room again and again until the resonant frequencies of the room reinforce themselves so that any semblance of my speech, with perhaps the exception of rhythm, is destroyed. What you will hear, then, are the natural resonant frequencies of the room articulated by speech. I regard this activity not so much as a demonstration of a physical fact, but more as a way to smooth out any irregularities my speech might have.
  4. I am sitting in a room different from the one you are in now. I am recording the sound of my speaking voice and I am going to play it back into the room again and again until the resonant frequencies of the room reinforce themselves so that any semblance of my speech, with perhaps the exception of rhythm, is destroyed. What you will hear, then, are the natural resonant frequencies of the room articulated by speech. I regard this activity not so much as a demonstration of a physical fact, but more as a way to smooth out any irregularities my speech might have.
  5. I am sitting in a room different from the one you are in now. I am recording the sound of my speaking voice and I am going to play it back into the room again and again until the resonant frequencies of the room reinforce themselves so that any semblance of my speech, with perhaps the exception of rhythm, is destroyed. What you will hear, then, are the natural resonant frequencies of the room articulated by speech. I regard this activity not so much as a demonstration of a physical fact, but more as a way to smooth out any irregularities my speech might have.
  6. I am sitting in a room different from the one you are in now. I am recording the sound of my speaking voice and I am going to play it back into the room again and again until the resonant frequencies of the room reinforce themselves so that any semblance of my speech, with perhaps the exception of rhythm, is destroyed. What you will hear, then, are the natural resonant frequencies of the room articulated by speech. I regard this activity not so much as a demonstration of a physical fact, but more as a way to smooth out any irregularities my speech might have.
  7. I am sitting in a room different from the one you are in now. I am recording the sound of my speaking voice and I am going to play it back into the room again and again until the resonant frequencies of the room reinforce themselves so that any semblance of my speech, with perhaps the exception of rhythm, is destroyed. What you will hear, then, are the natural resonant frequencies of the room articulated by speech. I regard this activity not so much as a demonstration of a physical fact, but more as a way to smooth out any irregularities my speech might have.
  8. I am sitting in a room different from the one you are in now. I am recording the sound of my speaking voice and I am going to play it back into the room again and again until the resonant frequencies of the room reinforce themselves so that any semblance of my speech, with perhaps the exception of rhythm, is destroyed. What you will hear, then, are the natural resonant frequencies of the room articulated by speech. I regard this activity not so much as a demonstration of a physical fact, but more as a way to smooth out any irregularities my speech might have.
  9. I am sitting in a room different from the one you are in now. I am recording the sound of my speaking voice and I am going to play it back into the room again and again until the resonant frequencies of the room reinforce themselves so that any semblance of my speech, with perhaps the exception of rhythm, is destroyed. What you will hear, then, are the natural resonant frequencies of the room articulated by speech. I regard this activity not so much as a demonstration of a physical fact, but more as a way to smooth out any irregularities my speech might have.
  10. I am sitting in a room different from the one you are in now. I am recording the sound of my speaking voice and I am going to play it back into the room again and again until the resonant frequencies of the room reinforce themselves so that any semblance of my speech, with perhaps the exception of rhythm, is destroyed. What you will hear, then, are the natural resonant frequencies of the room articulated by speech. I regard this activity not so much as a demonstration of a physical fact, but more as a way to smooth out any irregularities my speech might have.
  11. I am sitting in a room different from the one you are in now. I am recording the sound of my speaking voice and I am going to play it back into the room again and again until the resonant frequencies of the room reinforce themselves so that any semblance of my speech, with perhaps the exception of rhythm, is destroyed. What you will hear, then, are the natural resonant frequencies of the room articulated by speech. I regard this activity not so much as a demonstration of a physical fact, but more as a way to smooth out any irregularities my speech might have.
  12. I am sitting in a room different from the one you are in now. I am recording the sound of my speaking voice and I am going to play it back into the room again and again until the resonant frequencies of the room reinforce themselves so that any semblance of my speech, with perhaps the exception of rhythm, is destroyed. What you will hear, then, are the natural resonant frequencies of the room articulated by speech. I regard this activity not so much as a demonstration of a physical fact, but more as a way to smooth out any irregularities my speech might have.
  13. I am sitt – ing in a room different from the one you are in now. I am recording the sound of my speaking voice and I am going to pl'y it back into the room again and again until the resonant frequencies of the room reinforce themselves so that any semblance of my speech, with perhaps the exception of rhythm, is destroyed. What you will hear, then, are the natural resonant frequencies of the room articulated by speech. I regard this activity not so much as a demonstration of a physical fact, but more as a way to smooth out any irregularities my speech might have.
  14. I am sitting in a room «different from the one you are in now. I am recording the sound of my speak ing voice and I am going to play it back into the room again and again until the re–s–o–nant frequencies of the room reinforce themselves so that any semblance of my speech, with perhaps the exception of rhythm, is destroyed. What you will hear, then, are the natural resonant frequencies of the room articulated by speech. I regard this ac tiv i ty not so much as a “demonstration of a physical fact, but more «as a» way to smooth out any irregularities my speech might have.”»
  15. I am sitting in «a room different fr'm the one» you are in now. I “am re cord ing the sound of my speaking voice and I am going to play it back into the room again and again un · til the resonant frequencies of the room reinforce themselves so that any semblance of my speech, with perhaps the exception of rhythm, is destroyed. What you will hear, then, are th' natural resonant fre – quen – cies of the room articulated by speech. I regard this activity not so much as a demonstrati'n of a physical fact, but more as a way to smooth out any irregularities my speech might have.
  16. I am sitting in a room “different from the one you are in now. I am recording the sound of my speaking voice and I am going to” pl'y it back “into the room again and ¿again until the resonant? frequencies of the room” reinforce themselves so that any sem · blance ¿of «my speech, with» perhaps the exception of rhythm, is de · stroyed. Wh't you will hear, then, are the natural resonant frequencies of the room articulated by speech. I regard this activity not so much as a demonstration? of a physical fact, but more as a way to? smooth out any irregularities my speech might have.
  17. I am sitting in a room different from th' one you are in now. I am recording th' sound of my speaking voice and I am going to play it back in – to the room again and again un – til th' «resonant frequencies of the» room reinforce them–selves so “that any «semblance of my speech, with per haps the exception of rhythm, is destroy'd. Wh't “you will hear, then, are th' natural resonant fre – quen – cies of the room articulated by speech. I regard this” activity not «so much as a demonstration of a physical fact, but more as» a way to smooth out» any ir–reg–u–lar–i–ties my” speech might have.
  18. I am sitt·ing in a room different from th'? one you are in now. I am recording th' so'nd of my speaking voice and I am going to play it back into the room again and again until th' “resonant frequencies of the room reinforce themselves so th't any semblance of my speech, with” per–haps the exception of rhythm, is destroyed. “Wh't you” will hear, then, are the natural resonant frequencies of the room ar – tic – u – lat – ed by “speech. I regard” this activity not «so much as a» de mon s tra tion of a physical fact, but more as a way “to smooth out any irregularities my speech might have.”
  19. I am sitt ing in a “room different fr'm the one you” are in now. I am recording the sound of my “speaking voice and I am go – ing to play it back into the room again and again until th' resonant frequencies of the room re–in–forc' them – selves so th't any semblance of my speech, with per–haps th' exception of rhythm, is destroyed. Wh't you will hear, then, are the na–t–u–ral re – s – o – nant fre · quen · cies of the room ar tic u lat ed by speech. I re gard this ¿activity not so much as a demonstration ¿of a physical fact,? but more as a way to smooth? out any” irregularities my speech might have.
  20. “I am” sitting in a “room different from the one you are in now. I am recording th' sound of my speak·ing” voice and I am going to play “it back in to the room again and” again un·til the “resonant frequencies of the” ro'm “reinforce themselves so” th't any semblance of my speech, with perhaps th' exception of rhythm, is de·stroyed. Wh't you will hear, th'n, are th' natural resonant frequencies of «th' room» articulated by speech. I regard this activity not so «much as» a demonstration of a physical fact, but more as «a way to smo'th out any irregularities my speech might have.»
  21. I am ¿sitting in? a room dif·fer·ent from the one you are “in now. I am re cord'ng th' sound of my speaking voice and I am going to play” it back in to th' room again and? aga'n until th' re·s·o·nant frequencies of th' room re – in – force them–selves so th't any sem – blance of my speech, “with per haps the exception of rhythm, is de – stroyed. What you will hear, then, are th' na–t–u–ral resonant fre quen cies of the room articulated by speech. I re · gard this ac–tiv–i–ty “not so much as” «a demonstration of» a phys i cal fact, «but more as a» way to smooth out any irregulariti's my speech might have.
  22. “I am sitt · ing in” a room different fr'm the «one you are» in now. I am “recording the so'nd “of «my speaking» voice and I am go·ing ¿to pl'y it back into the room? again and again” un–til «the re·s·o·nant frequencies» of “the room reinforce them–selves so that any sem · blance” of my speech, with perhaps the” ex – cep – tion of rhythm, is de·stroy'd. Wh't you will «hear, ¿then, are th' «natural reson'nt frequencies of “the «room articulated» by «speech. reg'rd this activity not so much as a de mon s tra tion of» a physical” fact, but more as a way to smooth out any ir – reg – u – lar – i – ties my speech might have.»
  23. I am ¿sitt–ing in a room different? fr'm the? on' «you are in now. I? am recording ¿th' sound? of my? speak – ing voice and I am go ing to? play it back» in to the room again and again un til “th' resonant fre – quen – cies” of the room reinforce them – selv's “so th't” any sem–blance of my? speech, with per · haps the ex–cep–tion of rhythm, is “de–stroyed. What you” will hear, th'n, are th' na–t–u–ral reson'nt frequencies of the room ar · tic · u · lat · ed ¿by speech. I? re·gard th's ac · tiv · i · ty not so much as a de · mon · s · tra · tion of a physical fact, but mor' as a way to smooth out any irregularities my speech might have.
  24. am sitting in a room dif·fer·ent fr'm the one you ar' in now. I? am “recording th'” so'nd of my speaking voice and I am go'ng to pl'y ¿it back in · to the room again and again un·til? the resonant «fre quen cies of th' room re – in – forc' them–selves so «th't “any sem · blance” of» my “speech, with “perh'ps ¿the ex cep tion of rhythm,? is de · stroyed. “What you will hear, then, are th'? na t u ral” ¿re–s–o–nant fre quen cies «of the room ar · tic · u · lat · ed by speech. I «re · gard ¿th's ac – tiv – i – ty? not so» much as a “demonstrati'n of a” physical fact, but mor' as «a way to smooth “out ¿any ir–reg–u–lar–i–ties “my speech might” have.?”»»?””»
  25. I am sitting in a ro'm different fr'm the one you «are in now. I am re·cord·ing th' so'nd ¿of my speak'ng voic' and? I am» go'ng “to pl'y it back” in·to th' room again and again unt'l th' resonant frequencies of the room reinforc' «themselv's so» that any ¿sem–blance of “my speech, with perh'ps th' ex · cep · tion of rhythm, is destroyed. «What you» «will “he'r, «then, ar'» th'” natural» re – s – o – nant fre · quen · cies of? th' ro'm “ar tic u lat'd «by speech.» I” regard “th's ac – tiv – i – ty not so” much as” ¿a de·mon·s·trati'n? of? a phys·i·cal fact, but? ¿mor' as? «a way to smooth out» «any irregularities «my speech might» hav'.»?
  26. I am sitting in aa room «dif fer'ntent fr'm» th' one you are in now. I am recording th' sound of my «speaking voice» and I am go–ing to pl'yplay it backback into “th' roomroom” aga'n and ¿again un · til? th' re son'nt fre–quen–cies of th'the “room reinforce them–selves” so soth't anyany sem – blanc' of my speech, ¿withwith per – haps the ex cep ti'n? of rhythm, is de – stroyed.stroyed. Wh't you will hear, “then, are” “th' natur'l re – s – o – nant fre·quen·cies of the room roomar · tic · u · lat'd” by byspe'ch. I reg'rd th's activityty “notnot notso muchmuch asas aa” demonstrati'n of a «physical fact,» but more asas a away to smooth out any ir – reg – u – lar – i – ties tiesmy speech might hav'.?
  27. «I am sitt ing in ina room different fr'm the on' you ar' in innow. now.I am re·cord·ing» the soundsound «soundof my speak ing voicevoice and “I amam going” to pl'y it back «in to “th' theroom again and again un – til th'” re – son'nt frequencies of «th' room re–in–forc' «themselv's “so th't anyany ¿semblanc' ¿of my? speech,? with per·haps th'the theexcepti'n of rhythm, ¿isis isde·stroy'd.? What Whatyo' will willhear, th'n, are th' na · t · u · ral? reson'nt fre·quen·cies of th' room ar–tic–u–lat'd by speech. I reg'rd th's «activityty not so much as a de·mon·s·tra·tion of a? phys i cal» «calfact, fact,but» more «as a» way” to» smooth out? any anyir·reg·u·lar·i·ties my speechspeech might have.have.»»»
  28. ¿I am? «st–ti–inging ingin» a ro'm dif–fer–entent fr'm th' one “oneyou are inin now. I? am” re – cord – inging? th' sunod «ofof ofmy speak · ing voic'voice and» I amam “amgo'ng to” toplay itit back “int' the” roomroom againagain and andaga'n «un · til the» “re·s·o·nant fre – quen – ciescies of th'” ro'm roomre – in – force them–selvesselves so sothat anyany “sem blance blanceof my “mysepceh, with” per haps th'the ¿theexception tionof ofrhythm, is? de · stroyed. Wh't you «youwill hare, tnh', areare areth' na – t – u – ral re – s – o – nant «fceeure'qns of» “th' ro'mroom ar – tic – u – lat – eded” edby byspeech. II reg'rdgard th's activity «not so» “somuch «as a de·mon·s·tra·tion» ofof” a psyi – ah – cl fact, but butmore as? aa “away to smooth ¿outout «any il · re · ruear · itg's tiesmy myspeech might have.have.»?»
  29. amam si'tntging inin «aa “aroom «dif–fer–entent entfr'm» fromth' “theone oneyo'” are arein innow. now.I” “amam rrnicdeoging” ingth'» suond of mymy speak'ng voice «andand andI Iam go'ng ingto pl'yplay itit itback it – no» the room “again andand againagain againun–til th'” rn · naos'tnant “fre · quen · ci's ofof” th' ¿roomroom «re in force forcethem selves selvesso» th't? anyany snl · bacmee ofof my speech, «speech,with phr–paeshaps hapsth' ex · cep · ti'ntion? of» rh·hytm, is isde · stroy'd. stroyed.Wh't Whatyou will hear, hear,tnh', then,are th' nuartal rnoeas–nt fre·quen·ciescies of th' ro'm aueait·cl·rtd edby seep·hc. I rgaerd gardth's? attvi'cy tynot soso much as a demonstration ofof ofa piyschalcal «ft'c, fact,but more asas a way toto? st mo'hsmooth? “out outany” ir·reg·u·lar·i·tiesties» my speech mg'htmight hvea.
  30. I amam ¿amsitt · ing inin a roomroom “roomdre–fi'fnt entfr'm” th' on' «yo'you ¿youare “arein ¿now. now.I? amam amrd – c – nierog th' sonud of ¿my si · pankeg? vi coevoice voiceand II Iam” gionging? toto» “topl'y itit” backback backin·to th'the theroom againagain andand aiagn “un'tltil th'” thernose'nt fqrueee–icns? ofof th'the “ro'mroom reinforce” «forcetlvmeeeshs “soso «soth't thatany» anysem·blanc'” of ofmy secpeh, speech,wt'h» parh'pshaps hapsth' ecpx·tioention ¿tionof ofrh·myth,? rhythm,is dtoreyd's. stroyed.Wh't Whatyo' “willwill «he'r, th'n, «then,are “areth' thena–tra'l re son'ntnant nantfeu–cirqne's” ofof» ofth' «ro'mroom “ar – tic – u – lat – eded by” «speech. I» Ire – gard th'sthis? thisai titv cy tynot notso somuch «as a drtmt – seoian'ntion» ofof «aa apchasiyl fact, butbut» butmore asas aa “away to tosmooth smoothout any ieei–ua–gr–r–trils mymy speech? «might have.have.»»»”
  31. “I am” sintt'g «ingin ina» ro'mroom roomdif fer ent ¿fr'm th'the on'one ¿oneyo' areare? in? “now.now. now.I” Iam rni – dr – coeging th'the «thesound ofof ofmy myspani'kg» ingvoice “voiceand I” amam amgniog toto pa lyplay playit “bc'kback in·toto” th'the thero'm aag'nagain againand agi'nagain «againutn'l th' thersean not fe · qe · cuneirs ciesof? ofth'» roomroom roomrnioe·frc' tevmeshl'sselves “soso ¿th'tthat anyany? anyscbl–n–maee” of mymy myspeech, wt'hwith withphe'rps “hapsth' exio'tpcntion tionof ofrtymhh, rhythm,is dtry – oes'd.stroyed.” Wh'tWhat Whatyo' will “hra',hear, th'n,then,” areare «th'the na – tur'l rnoan estnant nantfneiqcreues» ofof «ofth' thero'm» ar · tal · cu · ti'ded byby byscepeh. II «rag'rdgard «tihs thisatc · ti'vy» notnot» so muchmuch muchas asa? adaroemttn·soin tionof ¿ofa pic·sy'hlcal? fc't,fact, «fact,but mor'more «moreas asa wayway wayto smo toh? out any anyir·reg·u·lar·i·ti's mymy myspeech «mightmight mighthe · va.»?»»
  32. I “Iam amsitn'tg” “ingin aa roomroom dffneeirtent” entform th'the “on'one ¿yo'you «youar' inin» innw'. II amam? rcin–der'ging” th'the su'ndsound soundof mymy mysnai'kpg ¿ingvcoi' «voiceand andI» amam? amgiong toto pl'yplay itit backback backit–no th'the roomroom? roomagi'n ¿againand “ai–ganagain unt'l th'the thernoaenst fceerniqeuscies ofof ¿th'the ¿theroom «rirenc · fo'force forcetes·mevehls» «selvesso taht anyany? anyscm – le – bane» blanceof? ofmy? spe'hc, “speech,wt'h withpehrp's” th'the theeice · toxpn tionof rh hytm,rhythm, rhythm,is dets · dor'y.stroyed.? WahtWhat” Whatyo'? «youwl'l haer,hear,» tn'h,then, areare th'the thentu·raal ralron san't feine – ceq'rscies ofof «ofth' thero'm» aei utrlc tad byby byshepce. speech.I? «Irer gad tihsthis» aic'tv · tyty tynot notso mc'hmuch muchas aa adiostm · rt · neaon ofof aa apschay'l calfc't, but “moremore moreas” aa away toto som tohsmooth outout any anyieir – rait – gurl's «my se'cphspeech mgh't mighthvea.»?

Celan Reads Japanese

To me it appeared as if all these poems were reminding me that hearing cannot be thought of separately from a threshold. This is something I had known back when I was living exclusively within the Japanese language. The ideogram to hear captured this knowledge without my being conscious of it. There is a saying that perhaps also belongs to this knowledge. It goes: Monzen no kozoo narawanu kyoo o yomu [‘The boy who lives before the gate of a temple can recite the prayer without learning it’]. For me, the boy who doesn’t go into the temple and remains standing at the gate embodied the person who is hearing. But now that I have begun to think in German quite frequently, I most often associate the verb to hear [‘hören’] with to belong to [‘zugehören’] so that when I hear something I feel the need to hurry after the unfamiliar voice and not remain standing on the threshold.Yoko Tawada translated by Susan Bernofsky

Ceiling

Nauman

Listening to Inner Fields by Delphine Dora & Bruno Duplant.

Also: Horace Tapscott with The Pan-Afrikan Peoples Arkestra, World’s Experience Orchestra, Messiaen (Quatuor pour la fin du temps) and My Body Full Of Stars – An Afrofuturism Mixtape.

Black Grey White

  1. been gone and done
  2. been gone and done
  3. been gone and done
  4. been gone and done
  5. been gone and done
  6. been gone and done
  7. been gone and done
  8. been gone and done
  9. been gone and done
  10. been gone and done
  11. been gone and done
  12. been gone and done
  13. been gone and done
  14. been gone and done
  15. been gone and done
  16. been gone and done
  17. been gone and done
  18. be'n gone and done
  19. be'n gone and done
  20. been gone «and done»
  21. been gone and done
  22. be'n gon' and done
  23. been gone and done
  24. been gon' and done
  25. been gone and «done»
  26. been gone and “anddone”
  27. “be'n gone and done”
  28. be'n gon' and don'
  29. «been gonegone» goneand anddnoe
  30. been gon'gone andand dnoedone
  31. be'n «beengon' goneand anddone»
  32. be'n gnoegone andand anddone

Antoine

Listening to Mike Weis – Ritual Mix. Especially Ogum Beira-Mar into Windham by Alabama Sacred Harp Singers (19m30s – 25m43s). More information on Type.